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Secrets to Mastering College Admissions Essays, Interviews, Letters of Recommendation, and Scholarships [Part 2]: [NYC QUEENS: Flushing, NY]

$1,000.00
SKU: COLLEGESUCCESS102-NYCQueens
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College is becoming incredibly expensive... so students and parents should learn how to get the best outcomes from the investments that they have striven for.  Actively use the senior high school years to provide a trajectory into a spectacular and worthwhile college experience which should be foundational for fulfilling future careers and adult life.  Instead of worrying about which college will accept you, use strategies that will make them court you instead.

That said, how does a student truly get into the best possible college with large scholarships and grants?  Surely you have heard many different ideas.  To answer that crucial question, this Success Seminar systematically examines a number of educational philosophies, methods, strategies, obstacles, and difficulties that people experience with ESSAYS, INTERVIEWS, LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION, SCHOLARSHIPS, and GRANTS.  

Gain perspective to discern what you should and should not convey in your essays and interviews.  Read and hear examples of essays that are successful or problematic.  Learn how certain types of colleges react differently to answers than other colleges.  As a bonus, discover secrets about letters of recommendations and cover letters.  

This Part 2 seminar also consists of a workshop in which students will practice brainstorming, writing, and interviewing if they so wish.  Participants who have the courage may practice interviewing in front of others.  For anyone interested in further help with essays and interviews, we have Part 3 workshops and individual Academic Coaching Sessions.

This ECRIT Academy Success Seminar can help you discover and consider critical aspects of college preparation and the college admissions process that you wouldn't otherwise contemplate.  Find out what the College Board and the admissions officers do not want you to know as universities change their criteria and methods.  Understand why top grades, AP courses, and outstanding test scores are often not enough to create the best college application or attain significant scholarships.  Realize what activities different universities may regard highly or not value.  Gain insight into how different types of college admissions officers think, pick students, and distribute scholarships and grants.  Learn about important techniques & strategies that you should start implementing and practicing (preferably years in advance).  Obtain a method to determine which schools to avoid so that you aren't faced with the dilemma of transferring in the future.  Hear about the positives and negatives of universities overseas.  Avoid the passive, costly, and heartbreaking mistakes that others make in junior high school, senior high school, and college.  Last, given that college applications are stressful for students and parents alike, figure out how to work collaboratively as a successful team from suggestions in the seminar.  These are just a few of the topics covered during this Success Seminar.

 

WHO:

Speakers led by Andrew Chi, M.D. of ECRIT

For any middle school student, high school student, and/or parents

 

WHEN:              

Date: SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2018

Time: 8:00 AM – 12 PM  (4 hours long) 

 

WHERE:

NYC: Downtown Flushing, Queens

Sheraton La Guardia East Hotel

near Main Street & College Point Blvd
135-20 39th Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 460-6666
 
 
WHY:
 
Avoid the passive, costly, and heartbreaking mistakes that others make.
 
 
HOW TO ARRIVE:
 
Subway:     2 blocks away - the "Flushing Main Street Station" of the NYC Subway Purple “7 train"
Train:          3 blocks away - the "Flushing Main Street Station" of the Long Island RR "Port Washington Line"
Car:             Via the Van Wyck Exprwy (I-678), Whitehurst Exprwy (I-678), and Long Island Exprwy (I-278)
                    Parking is plentiful in the garage under the Sheraton or two blocks away at 138th Street
 
Near:          La Guardia Airport:                                               10 min by free shuttle
                    Arthur Ashe US Open Tennis Stadium:               5 min away by car
                    NY Mets baseball team Citifield Stadium:          4 min away by car
 
PROCESS:
 
When your payment is processed, we will send you a confirmation via your email or mailing address.  We may later send you an email or envelope with some preparatory material to read, write, and ponder.  When you check in to our seminars, please bring your confirmation email or letter.  It is a good idea to bring a photo I.D. so that you can prove who you are if someone else tries to impersonate you.  At our seminars, we will provide a seminar packet, planning exercises, checklists, and Q&A time.  Your participation in our seminars can be active or passive as appropriate.
 

Customer Reviews

Overall:
Reviewed by Supriya D, 10/25/2014

A+. This is a superb and unique college application prep. The individual coaching is also incredible. In a world of gritty competition, there are few who are willing to speak the truth and share the real best ways to get into college. Dr. Chi was tremendously helpful and effective, and I recommend him to other good earnest people.

Reviewed by K T, 08/22/2014

Excellent workshop. The previous two seminars were also quite helpful.

The first seminar about college admissions analyzed and critiqued about 30 books regarding college applications and high school preparation.

The next two seminars about college admissions essays and interviews covers and critiques more than 10 books.

Aside from the books by Michele Hernandez and others, the essay seminars closely followed and critiqued Standout College Application by Chisolm and Ivey who are both law school grads. Like Hernandez, Chisolm was a Dartmouth admissions officer... and Ivey was Dean of Admissions at University of Chicago Law School. While the presenter agrees with many points by Chisholm, Ivey, Hernandez, and others, there are many points of disagreement given with compelling reasons. While much of their advice is good and practical - including friend and family teamwork that the presenter agrees with - Chisholm and Ivey actually provide many weak or concerning examples of their ideas... many of which would ruin an application.

We truly appreciate the analysis provided by these seminars. The contradictions and questionable omissions by former admissions officers and counselors who wrote those books are alarming. Fortunately they are answered in these seminars. In contrast with the books, the ideas unique to these seminars really seemed geared toward brilliance, success, cultural concerns, psychology, and negotiation with the universities... things we hadn't really thought of before.

Reviewed by wait a, 08/21/2014

I don't know if I attended the exact same workshop as the previous commentator, but this is what I heard:

Ghostwriting is very common in NY and other places. Some is unethical, whereas some is common practice. There is ghostwriting for all kinds of things: essays, newspaper articles, autobiographies, commencement speeches, PR speeches, etc. Most US Presidents use speech writers and ghost writers for the memoirs. Ghostwriters can be very effective for any of these things, and Essay Coaches may be very helpful as well, but either of them may cause more trouble than success in part because many neglect to conduct a good interview of a student and do not often understand the psychology of college admissions despite what they claim. Worse, they rarely care about the student and some may reuse the same essay, sentences, or cliches for many students. They can be shady and very detrimental.

The speaker also faulted the universities for rarely teaching their students how to publish their works. How could an English major go through college without learning how to publish anything?!?! There are several reasons that the speaker gave that are interesting. In any case, it makes some sense given what I've seen. But how is that relevant to writing college admission essays? I can't explain it, but the workshop does, and it seemed logical.

Anyway, Part 2 seems to give psychological insight and practical help for college admissions interviews and other types of interviews... such as graduate school interviews and employment interview.

The workshop also mentions teamwork as a possible help for writing and editing essays. Thus it is also helpful to have a friend or family member with you for some of the exercises in the workshop... because even though it may sound embarrassing they may have additional insights about you that you may not have. Also, it turns out that they can be helpful when you get stuck with essay writing or other aspects of the application which isn't good if you have many to write. I see know that there is a lot of psychology involved.

The main message is that you may be a good writer in high school or in other areas, but college admissions essay writing is different. Thus, it is important to understand what is needed so that you have an overall strategy of impact for all of your essays which is different for different types of essays instead of merely answering them as best as you can, as uniquely as you can, or as deeply as you can. And the strategy must shift for different colleges, too.

Reviewed by Another a, 08/18/2014

There are many secrets and topics in is seminar series that you probably can't find in a book or another seminar.  

One topic is ghostwriting, which is a common open secret around NY.  Some people assume that it works, but this seminar uniquely talks about the effectiveness and problems with relying upon parents, teachers, or professional ghost writers for college entrance essays.

Another topic is about the psychology of writing and influencing someone. All too often, we are taught to write something according to what we or the teacher thinks is best... but we aren't taught to truly write for other audiences who are different than our teachers. The speaker indicates that College English majors rarely get something published in part because they do not understand their audience.